Upcoming Public Workshops:

Planning & Scheduling Fundamentals

January 2020

28 - 30
Charleston, SC
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Reliability Fundamentals

February 2020

4 - 6
Charleston, SC
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Reliability Improvement Roadmap Workshop

February 2020

18 - 18
Houston, TX
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Digital Transformation in Reliability

February 2020

19 - 19
Houston, TX
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Introduction to Reliability Centered Lubrication (RCL)

February 2020

20 - 20
Houston, TX
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Shutdown, Turnaround, Outage

February 2020

25 - 27
Houston, TX
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Advanced Reciprocating Compressor Analysis

March 2020

3 - 5
Houston, TX
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Condition Monitoring Fundamentals

March 2020

17 - 19
Houston, TX
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Planning & Scheduling Fundamentals

March 2020 - April 2020

31 - 2
Houston, TX
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Leading Reliability Improvement

April 2020

21 - 23
Houston, TX
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Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

April 2020

28 - 30
Charleston, SC
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Basic Reciprocating Compressor Analysis

April 2020

28 - 30
Houston, TX
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Reliability Fundamentals

July 2020

7 - 9
Charleston, SC
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Condition Monitoring Fundamentals

August 2020

4 - 6
Charleston, SC
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Reliability Improvement Roadmap Workshop

August 2020

11 - 11
Charleston, SC
Register Now
Planning & Scheduling Fundamentals

August 2020

18 - 20
Charleston, SC
Register Now
Leading Reliability Improvement

September 2020

15 - 17
Charleston, SC
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Reliability Fundamentals

September 2020

22 - 24
Houston, TX
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Intermediate Planning & Scheduling

September 2020 - October 2020

29 - 1
Charleston, SC
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Shutdown, Turnaround, Outage

October 2020

6 - 8
Charleston, SC
Register Now
Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

October 2020

6 - 8
Houston, TX
Register Now
Leading Reliability Improvement

October 2020

13 - 15
Charleston, SC
Register Now
Basic Reciprocating Compressor Analysis

October 2020

13 - 15
Houston, TX
Register Now
Reliability Fundamentals

November 2020

3 - 5
Charleston, SC
Register Now
Reliability Improvement Roadmap Workshop

November 2020

17 - 17
Charleston, SC
Register Now
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Chat With An Expert. Our reliability experts are ready to answer your questions
Reliability Engineer

What to Look for When You Hire a Reliability Engineer

A reliability engineer is critical to maintaining the stability and performance of your products and systems. With such an important role, it's also important to hire the right person. Depending on the role, consider years of experience, reliability engineering courses, your business’s culture, and the applicant's overall career goals. Here's what to look for when hiring a reliability engineer.

Previous coursework and certifications

Is your candidate a certified reliability engineer? Have they taken reliability engineering courses before, and are there other industry-related certifications they may have invested in? Reliability engineering courses and certifications indicate that an engineer has the academic knowledge to perform the given tasks. Looking at the dates on those courses and certifications will tell you how current their knowledge is likely to be.

Leadership skills and the ability to articulate direction 

Often, a reliability engineer needs to be able to take charge. In this role, the ability to influence change is key. They need others to listen to them and lead by example in their roles. Consequently, the ability to articulate direction, work with others, and lead subordinates is important. When interviewing candidates, gauge their soft skills and people skills, and decide whether those skills are suitable to your facility’s work environment.

Tech-savvy aptitudes

Reliability engineers must be tech savvy, with the aptitude to quickly learn how to operate and manage the technology your business integrates. In particular, you will want them to be roughly familiar with the processes and equipment that your business uses. The more well-versed they are in technology, the less critical it is that they already know how to use your specific technology. Applicants can bring new value to your business if they have certifications in other areas of tech that are applicable to your operations. 


There are countless reliability engineering courses, certifications, traits, and professional qualifications to look for. Be aware that there is also more than one way that a reliability engineer can show their technological acumen. Stay up-to-date on the latest in reliability engineering to best understand where the applicant stands in today’s modern market. It can definitely take some time to find the right fit. Allied Reliability has the resources to help you find a reliability engineer that meets your firm’s needs.

 

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